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20120929
20121007
Search Results 0 to 9 of about 10 (some duplicates have been removed)
lincoln and steven douglas. they were part of the race for one of illinois's two senate seats. lincoln lost the debates and elections, but the conversations launched him into national prominence and lincoln went on to become one of the the greatest presidents today. what if that's what got him killed, changing the course of the nation? the next guest tells the story of an assassination plot wider and far more sinister than we imagined. joining us is timothy o'brien, the executive editor of the huffington post and the author of "the lincoln conspiracy." >> it's great to be here, s.e. >> i love alternative history and the kinds of things eric larson does with history. this is a combination of history and fiction. tell me, was this a conspiracy you actually believe in? do you think think this is what happened or did you dream this up to sort of enhance a novelistic new version of history? >> lincoln conspiracy is a historical thriller about this incredible moment of change after the lincoln assassination and the industrialization of america and cities and society and ferment. and the assa
, one american ambassador, christopher stevens, that was 2 1/2 weeks ago, 2 1/2 weeks, that saw the administration describe this first as a spontan
ambassador, christopher stevens, that was 2 1/2 weeks ago, 2 1/2 weeks, that saw the administration describe this first as a spontaneous outburst, even though reporting shows that officials knew within 24 hours it was not.
, the mission was in benghazi, we understand that chris stevens wanted to be there, had a connection to benghazi, had been there during the war. but was he adequately secured and what about the nurfailures intelligence. >> they knew libya was not going to calm down overnight and have multiparty elections and a normal place overnight. they had to look at the tactical issues there and it seemed there were a lot of problems with militias running around not integrated into any police force let alone the national army. there were issues they needed to look at. on the other hand you're trying to manage that risk with the need to get out, talk to the libyan people, make sure they understand that we care, that we didn't just lose interest once gadhafi left the scene. i think it is -- it was very important to get out there, but, you know, i think the accountability review board is going to look at that very crucial question how well did they manage the risk? you cannot eliminate the risk. this is what diplomats do. we are out there, many of these circumstances, so i think it was the right thing to be out
compound three days after the killings there the personal diary of slain ambassador chris stevens. now "the washington post" up loaded to its website images of some sensitive documents one of its reporters retrieved from the same ground two weeks later. these include annotated three-page minute by minute schedule for the ambassador covering three-day period of september 10th, 11th, 12th, the is 12th being a day the ambassador never lived to see, jenna. jenna: tell us about the panel the state department themselves created? >> reporter: as our catherine herridge reports last hour, that secretary clinton's accountability review board, arb is expected to report findings within 60 days of the first session. there is caveat. the chair of the board, former u.s. ambassador to the united nations thomas pickering can request and resee more time. aiding pickering will be former chairman of the joint chiefs of staff, admiral mike mullen. a spokeswoman for secretary clinton was asked if the department of state will cooperate equally with the various probes underway. >> i think we believe that we're goi
there is a ritual to romney's debate prep. after each session, his inner circle, beth myers, stewart stevens and ed gles pe, spend hours going over his answers with him so see how how can improve. >> you have to figure out how they're likely to expres themselves with the body language is going to be like. >> portman learned that in 2000. >> he got kind of physical. sort of stood up, al gore got right in his face and so in the debate preps with governor george w. bush in 2000, i did that. and governor bush's reaction was of course, he's not going to do that. that's ridiculous. >> but can he get things done? >> that's exactly what gore did. >> and i believe i can. >> did he practice a nod or did you just -- warn him he was going to physically approach him. >> i think the point is that governor bush was ready for it and that was not a high point for vice president gore. >> that's fascinating, that they knew gore was going to try to sort of physically approach him. >> that's right. as senator portman said, it's because he spent so much time studying al gore at the time, studying his debates with bill b
Search Results 0 to 9 of about 10 (some duplicates have been removed)